Albert Stone


Albert R. Stone started his career as a photographer for the Rochester Herald in 1903. It became the "Times Union" and then the "Democrat & Chronicle" when Frank Gannett purchased it beginning in the early 20th century. Times Square on the corner of Exchange Boulevard and Broad Street housed the Times. The D and C's head quarters are still across the street. "Stoney," as he was affectionaltely known, taught his son, Daniel, who started in the printing department at the D and C, photography. The two worked together for many years. They amassed a collection of more than 14,000 glass-plate negatives as well as some film negatives and prints. Throughout their careers the Stone's took pictures of 4 US Presidents, countless dignitaries and thousands and thousands of Rochester citizens and it's surrounding neighbors.
Albert R. Stone was at the first public flight of Glenn Curtiss's "White Wing" in Pleasant Valley and took the first aerial photo's of Rochester on Kodak's experimental Kodak A1 aerial camera designed by William Folmer.
He was the color caller for opening day of baseball in Rochester every year for 25 plus years meeting George Sisler and The Babe.

The Rochester Museum & Science Center has cared for the Stone Glass Plate Negative Collection since 1943 when Albert's grandaughter, Helen Stone Reinhard sold the negatives for $500. They were lowered from a family attic through a window by her and her brother, Bob and placed in a truck for delivery. Bundles of negatives were tied to pulleys and ropes. 3 tons of glass were moved by the two young Stones. Helen was 21 and Bob was 19. Many images fell from the attic window and were lost forever.
The RMSC creates exhibits documenting everyday life in the Greater Rochester area using the Stone images.

Stone died in 1934 of heart failure at the age of 68. A large funeral procession made its way through the City. A camera was built of flowers, mostly Lilacs, the size of a vehicle (float). Albert R. Stone is buried somewhere in the City. It is believed his tomb says, Alfred Stone.

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