Rochester

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Skyline.jpgRochester skyline as seen from the bikepath near the U of R, 8-2008

Rochester, NY is located in the center of Western New York, the portion of NY which sits atop Pennsylvania. Census data for 2004 shows Rochester having 212,481 residents living withing the City of Rochester, and a total of 1,037,831 in the Greater Rochester Area.

More statistical data is available from the article City of Rochester.

Rochester In the News

History 1

In 1811 Colonel Nathaniel Rochester and his partners surveyed their land and offered lots for sale in Rochesterville. Rochester was incorporated as a city in 1834, primarily on land purchased from the [wikipedia]Seneca Indians about 50 years earlier. The Genesee River was the economic engine of the era, powering numerous mills that led to Rochester being labeled the Flour City. Shoe and clothing manufacturing and the nursery industry replaced milling as the economic focal point between 1850 and the turn of the century.

Irish laborers (see Erie Canal) and German tailors and seamstresses comprised a large percentage of the non-native population of the 1800s, but a tidal wave of Italian immigrants began arriving in 1900 and has remained influential since.

Bausch and Lomb and Gleason Tool led the manufacturing charge after the [wikipedia]Civil War, but George Eastman's Brownie camera became the single most significant invention of the region and spurred substantial job growth until the [wikipedia]Great Depression made photography too much of a luxury for the common man. But [wikipedia]World War II created a need for optics, precision grinding and other manufacturing, and then came the introduction of the Xerox copier by Haloid.

The end of the war was also the start of suburban growth. The city's population loss was initially offset by the migration of blacks from the south in search of manufacturing jobs. But hand-in-hand with that came stress on the infrastructure — housing, schooling and medical services — and Rochester was slow to react. According to the PBS Documentary July '64, Rochester's major employers refused to hire or promote African-Americans, despite record low unemployment rates.

Three days of riots broke out in July 1964, resulting in four deaths and numerous arrests. Saul Alinsky, an organizer of note according to some and a rabble-rouser according to others, soon arrived and the FIGHT organization (Freedom, Independence, God, Honor, Today) brought forth gifted black leaders including the Rev. Franklin Florence and Dr. Bernard Gifford.

William A. Johnson Jr. became the city's first black mayor in 1994, stepping into a most challenging era for Rochester. Kodak has shriveled to a mere shell of its old self, overwhelmed by complacency in the early days of the digital photography boom.

Random bits:

Areas in the City are defined by Neighborhoods and Neighborhood Associations as well as Real Estate Quadrants and Wards.

Principal Suburbs:

See also:

More Info:

Were you looking for another Rochester?
[WWW]The TOWN of Rochester, also in New York State, [WWW]in Ulster County, downstate New York - [WWW]official website - Roughly halfway between New York City and Albany.

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OK, gang. I've taken a first shot at this entry, but it still amounts to little more than deck chairs on the Queen Mary. Please add some size, shape and direction to it. I'll be more than happy to make passes through it from time to time to flesh out any sketchy thoughts/outlines. — [JohnMoriello]


2005-10-14 14:59:45   hmm, I'll try to gather some basic, current information from the city website and the county —RossHattori


2007-06-21 10:50:19   Need some stuff about Seth Ebenezer Allen. He was the first permanent white settler in what is now downtown Rochester. Arch Merrill's Sketchbook has been digitzed. [WWW]http://www.rootsweb.com/~nymonroe/book/sketchbook-1.htmCarolLucky