St. Luke's Church

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Location
17 South Fitzhugh Street, Rochester NY, 14614 [Directions]
Phone
585 546 7730
Fax
585 546 7733
Email
<office AT twosaints DOT org>
Website
[WWW]http://www.twosaints.org/

St. Luke's Church is the oldest public building in Rochester. It was built in 1823 and was Nathaniel Rochester's home church for many years. It is located at 17 South Fitzhugh Street, in the middle of downtown Rochester. According to the Landmark Society, it is the oldest surviving public building in the city of Rochester and an unusually early example of 19th-century Gothic Revival style. It's located right downtown across from Irving Place and next to Rochester Arts Academy.

William Pitkin, Rochester's 12th mayor, married Louisa Lucinda Rochester (a descendant of Nathaniel Rochester) at St. Luke's on June 20, 1848.1

In 1988 St. Luke's, the oldest Episcopal congregation in the city and St. Simon Cyrene, the city's traditionally African American Episcopalian congregation, merged forming [WWW]St. Luke & St. Simon Cyrene Episcopal Church, and the current rector posts his sermons on [WWW]his blogger page.

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2007-04-15 22:43:26   It's 1823, and I have a photo to prove it if anyone's interested. —GrahamSaathoff


2007-04-19 14:20:59   You may want to post that on this page. —JoannaLicata


2007-04-20 17:19:01   The building at 13 South Fitzhugh Street is the ROCHESTER FREE ACADEMY (not the Rochester Arts Academy). The Free Academy was Rochester's first school. The building also served as the Municipal Court and the Board of Education building. In 1982 it was converted to private offices, and had a famous restaurant in the basement. The building sits vacant today. It was just recently puchased by a South Florida developer who plans the adaptive reuse of the building, which will be converted to residential apartments and commercial spaces. —GeorgeTraikos



2008-08-01 08:55:29   Fitzhugh is the only street by that name in the Country, if not the World. At least that is what I was told as a child. —SignoraElettra